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Physics > Young's Modulus


Page location: Info Library> Physics > Young's Modulus
Essentially, Young's Modulus (E) is a measure of the stiffness of a material. Young's modulus, E, can be calculated by dividing the tensile stress by the tensile strain:

E = Tensile Stress / Tensile Strain

The table below shows the approximate Young's Moduli of some common materials.

Material Young's modulus (E) in GPa Young's modulus (E) in lbf/in² (psi)
Rubber (small strain) 0.01 - 0.1 1,500 - 15,000
PTFE (Teflon) 0.5 75000
Low density polyethylene 0.2 30,000
HDPE 1.379 200000
Polypropylene 1.5 - 2 217,000 - 290,000
Bacteriophage capsids 1 - 3 150,000 - 435,000
Polyethylene terephthalate 2 - 2.5 290,000 - 360,000
Polystyrene 3 - 3.5 435,000 - 505,000
Nylon 3 - 7 290,000 - 580,000
Oak wood (along grain) 11 1,600,000
Pine wood (along grain) 8.963 1,300,000
MDF (wood composite) 3.654 530,000
High - strength concrete (under compression) 30 4,350,000
Magnesiummetal (Mg) 45 6,500,000
Aluminium alloy 69 10,000,000
Glass 65 - 90 9,400,000 - 13,000,000
Brass and bronze 103 - 124 17,000,000
Titanium (Ti) 105 - 120 15,000,000 - 17,500,000
Copper (Cu) 110 - 130 16,000,000 - 19,000,000
Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (50/50 fibre/matrix, unidirectional, along grain) 125 - 150 18,000,000 - 22,000,000
Wrought iron and steel 190 - 210 30,000,000
Beryllium (Be) 287 41,500,000
Tungsten (W) 400 - 410 58,000,000 - 59,500,000
Silicon carbide (SiC) 450 65,000,000
Osmium (Os) 550  
Tungsten carbide (WC) 450 - 650 65,000,000 - 94,000,000
Single carbon nanotube 1,000+ 145,000,000+
Diamond (C) 1,050 - 1,200 150,000,000 - 175,000,000

Young's modulus is named after Thomas Young, an 18th Century British scientist.